Posts Tagged ‘American Journal of Family Therapy’

A Family’s Heartbreak celebrates anniversary with free copies

Sunday, March 27th, 2011

A Family’s Heartbreak, LLC. will give away free copies of A Family’s Heartbreak: A Parent’s Introduction to Parental Alienation to celebrate the book’s second anniversary of helping families understand and address parental alienation.

“It’s been a very gratifying two years,” explains author Mike Jeffries. “If you would have told me when I was writing A Family’s Heartbreak in the small apartment I moved to during the divorce that my words would reach parents in places as far away as the U.K., Canada, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and countless other countries I wouldn’t have believed it. It just goes to show how universal the problem of parental alienation is and how hungry parents, legal and mental health professionals are for objective information. So in honor of the book’s anniversary we’re going to give away ten copies of the book to the first ten people who write us via our website at http://www.afamilysheartbreak.com

Readers, including legal and mental health professionals, have raved about A Family’s Heartbreak: A Parent’s Introduction to Parental Alienation in the two years since it’s publication. The American Journal of Family Therapy said, “this book should be required reading for any parent who is victimized by parental alienation as well as professionals who treat or evaluate alienation.” Virginia Gilbert, a marriage and family therapist, also said the book should be required reading, “for every graduate psychology and family therapy training program,” while Attorney David Pisarra from Men’s Family Law called the book, “an excellent exploration into the twisted ‘Wonderland’ that is parental alienation.”

“We’ve been honored that so many people have taken the time to read and respond positively to A Family’s Heartbreak,” Jeffries added, “that we want to give something back to start our third year on the market. Our giveaway is simple and sincere — the first 10 people to write me at mike@afamilysheartbreak.com will get a free copy of our book. We’ll even pay the postage. All the writer has to do is give us a name and a mailing address.”

A Family’s Heartbreak: A Parent’s Introduction to Parental Alienation is the true story of one parent’s struggle to maintain a normal, loving relationship with his young son in the face of overwhelming odds. You can purchase the book at http://afamilysheartbreak.com, order it through any bookstore, or buy it at Amazon — http://www.amazon.com/Familys-Heartbreak-Introduction-Parental-Alienation/dp/0979696011/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1301246509&sr=1-1.

American Journal of Family Therapy gives A Family’s Heartbreak two thumbs up

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

“It is the combination of the detailed account of the author attempting to come to grips with his inability to normalize his relationship with his son, together with Dr. Davies providing a great deal of support and insight to him as to how alienation takes place, that makes this book required reading for any parent who is victimized by parental alienation as well as professionals who treat or evaluate alienation.”

That’s just one excerpt from The American Journal of Family Therapy’s recent review of A Family’s Heartbreak: A Parent’s Introduction to Parental Alienation. The American Journal of Family Therapy published the review in its upcoming issue, Volume 38, Issue 3, 2010, pages 279-280, and is available online. The publication will be out in print on May 28, 2010. 

The American Journal of Family Therapy is the incisive, authoritative, independent voice in an ever-changing field. The publication includes the latest techniques for treating families; theory on normal and dysfunctional family relationships; research on sexuality and intimacy; the effects of traditional and alternative family styles; and community approaches to family intervention. All articles in the publication undergo editorial screening and peer review.

The review also cites author Mike Jeffries for, “providing the reader with a rational understanding of the risk factors that can be potentiated in the alienating parent as a result of the threat of abandonment. The reader is presented with a rational understanding of what could otherwise be an incomprehensible switch of loyalties by the child from being attuned to both parents to the child’s completely disregarding, denigrating, and rejecting the other parent and the other parent’s extended family.”

The review, written by Abe Worenklein, Ph.D., a Clinical Psychologist from Outremont, Quebec, also calls parental alienation a serious form of abuse. “Furthermore,” Worenklein wrote, “Jeffries’ and Davies’ accounts make it very clear that not only is an alienated child being robbed of his childhood but that the alienation should be seen as a serious form of psychological/emotional abuse that can impact significantly on future relationships and on the child’s development.”

A Family’s Heartbreak: A Parent’s Introduction to Parental Alienation, is available at http://www.afamilysheartbreak.com, on Amazon, and through bookstores worldwide.

Fairness and Accuracy?

Saturday, March 27th, 2010

The March edition of Clinical Psychiatry News carried an opinion piece about the ongoing revisions to the upcoming edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The piece was not about parental alienation. However, the author used a few paragraphs to present such an inaccurate, unsubstantiated and biased account of parental alienation and the people who support its inclusion in the DSM that it makes you wonder if anyone at the publication even reviews content prior to publication. 

In the column the author stated that Dr. Richard Gardner was nothing more than a self-published protector of child sex abusers who was abusive to mothers in court. The author presented no evidence to support his claims, and chose to ignore that Gardner was published in many professsional publications; including The American Journal of Family Therapy, The American Journal of Forensic Psychology, and the Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. The author also ignored, or didn’t bother to find out, that family court is a place where judges, legal and mental health professionals are routinely rude and disrespectful to mothers and fathers. If a rude professional’s behavior was enough to keep a diagnosis out of the DSM, this bible of the mental health field would be reduced to a one page flyer.
 
The author further implied that any member of a Father’s Rights group is nothing more than a sexually abusive father who wants parental alienation in the DSM so he can keep abusing the kids. This statement would be laughable if it were not so damaging on two fronts: first, implying that any father who believes the other parent is trying to damage or destroy his relationship with their child must be abusive; and two, insulting the many loving fathers who have normal, healthy relationships with their children but believe in the broader goals of these organizations — goals that have nothing to do with parental alienation. Further, the author ignored the many loving mothers who have been alienated from their children by fathers. As we’ve said many times, neither mothers or fathers have cornered the market on the unhealthy emotional issues that lead one parent to alienate a child from another parent.   

The author appeared to resent the political nature of updating the DSM and on that point we agree. Yet his inflammatory, unsubstantiated words about parental alienation, fathers and father’s rights groups was better suited to a special interest group’s marketing brochure than a professional mental health publication. While the author is entitled to his opinion, and Clinical Psychiatry News did label the column an “Opinion” piece, the fair and balanced thing for this publication to do would be to allow another professional to refute the biased and unsubstantiated claims about parental alienation in its next issue. No one expects an organization publication to match the journalistic standards of the New York Times or Washington Post, but even an organization publication should have minimum standards for fairness, balance and accuracy.

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